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Exercise is the best medicine!

Keeping Loved Ones Fit at Home

No one is too old to get in shape research shows that, as we age, exercise can help our bodies avoid common health problems like weight gain, illness, insomnia, balance issues, and memory loss. Training is a critically important component of aging life, but it’s also an incredibly complex topic. Many loved ones have physical impairments that prevent them from being able to exercise as they once did. Still, there are ways for an older adult to incorporate exercise into their daily routine successfully.

There are many ways you can help your loved one stay fit at home by engaging in safe, fun exercise plans. 

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Setting Up

your Loved One for Success

Setting up a home gym for an older adult can be a snap with the right equipment.  

  • Provide your loved one with an extra-thick yoga mat for extra cushioning and support.
  • Install grab bars around the gym space to help prevent falls. 
  • Make sure the exercise area you’ve set up for your loved one is well-lit.
  • Invest in some age-friendly gym equipment. Adaptive grip weights can be more comfortable for people who have arthritis. 
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Getting Started

with Exercise

The first step to a new exercise plan is always the hardest. Help your loved one start their exercise journey with a few simple steps.

  • Make sure your loved one has a pair of sturdy, non-slip exercise shoes so they can move around safely.
  • Create a pre- and post-workout ritual with your loved one to help them warm-up and cool down. This will ensure their body adjusts gradually to the increased heart rate and blood flow.
  • Consult with your loved one’s doctor to learn more about what exercises might be most appropriate for them.
  • Start slow; going from zero to sixty is never a good idea with activity no matter your age. Incorporate exercise gradually into your loved one’s life. Try starting by exercising two days a week for shorter periods and work your way up to more frequent, lasting exercises.

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Cognitive Decline

Loved ones exercising at home may struggle to pick the right workout routine for their needs. Work closely with your loved one to develop a program that is right for them.

  • Ask your loved one what activities they enjoy doing and try to incorporate these into their workouts. Some older adults find dance to be an enjoyable way to get in their exercise.
  • Engage your loved one with low-impact workouts. Yoga and Tai Chi are popular choices, but some families even choose to invest in a recumbent bike. If your loved one has mobility impairments, try a seated workout.  
  • Schedule a variety of exercises throughout the week. This will work on different parts of their body to keep them healthier.
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Start Now

Cognitive Decline

Loved ones exercising at home may struggle to pick the right workout routine for their needs. Work closely with your loved one to develop a program that is right for them.

  • Ask your loved one what activities they enjoy doing and try to incorporate these into their workouts. Some older adults find dance to be an enjoyable way to get in their exercise.
  • Engage your loved one with low-impact workouts. Yoga and Tai Chi are popular choices, but some families even choose to invest in a recumbent bike. If your loved one has mobility impairments, try a seated workout.  
  • Schedule a variety of exercises throughout the week. This will work on different parts of their body to keep them healthier.
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Staying Motivated

to Exercise

Older adults aren’t an exception to the rule – everyone struggles to stay motivated when working out at home. Simple changes you make to your loved one’s schedule, and routine can help motivate them to keep exercising.

  • Offer to exercise with your loved one, so they have someone to help hold them accountable.  
  • Incentivize workouts by creating rewards and goals that are important to your loved one. Maybe a week’s worth of successful workouts earns a day at the movies? Use what works for your family. Try enrolling in a silver exercise class at the local YMCA or gym. This can keep your loved one engaged in their exercise program.  

Exercise can positively change your loved one’s physical and mental health. With a few pieces of carefully selected equipment, you can create a risk-free environment and provide hours of enjoyment for your loved one. If you’re feeling overwhelmed by all the changes that come with aging, including setting up an adult-friendly gym, reach out to our trusted staff here at Beverly’s Daughter for kind, compassionate service from people who understand your concerns. We will respond within 48 hours to assist with any questions you may have and help you find appropriate solutions to help your loved one live a happy, healthy life.

Signs Of Memory Loss

As caregivers and concerned family members, we want to make sure our elder loved ones are healthy both physically and mentally. Memory loss is very common amongst older adults, but not a ‘normal’ part of the aging process. We want to identify memory loss early so it can be treated effectively, and in some cases, reversed.

Learn More »

Role Reversal: When Kids Become Caretakers

If you have an aging parent, It’s likely that you’ve already begun to help your parents in ways you’ve never had to before. Maybe you’ve begun to manage paying the bills, driving mom to doctor’s visits, or helping dad out with yard work that he just can’t do anymore. This process of role reversal is called “parentification,”  and it describes the dynamic wherein children assume more and more responsibility and control over their parent’s lives, eventually acting as parents to their parents. While confusing and possibly overwhelming, this process is a very common part of aging for older adults and their families.

Learn More »

Alzheimer’s Is Life Altering For The Whole Family

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of Dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking, and behavior. Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease that eventually interferes with even the most basic daily living tasks. Changes in behavior and personality may require a person with Alzheimer’s to require round the clock care in a specialized facility.

Learn More »

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