Using Technology to Communicate Care

For many American homes, voice-controlled speakers and personal assistant devices have become a norm of convenience. From turning up the music volume to dimming lights, Amazon’s line of Echo products have become a source of home-living ease for many. However, an often overlooked benefit of the Echo product line-up is the added ease of daily living it can provide our aging adults. And, in the time of social-distancing and medical isolation, these products can also increase connection and interaction with our loved ones without the need to compromise safety.

Holiday Gift Guide: Best Gifts for Aging Parents

Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on linkedin LinkedIn Share on reddit Reddit Holiday Gift Guide: Best Gifts for Aging Parents The holidays are approaching and it’s time to consider gifts for your loved ones. With aging parents, it’s not always easy to decide what you should get them. We know how […]

Home Away From Home: Granny Flats

If you thought having your aging parent move into your house was the only alternative to expensive assisted livng facilities when they are no longer able to live independently, you may be the perfect candidate for an ADU, or Accessory Dwelling Unit.  ADUs are also sometimes referred to as granny flats or mother-in-law cottages.  These are small standalone units added to the backyard of an existing single family home, or apartments converted from extra space in the house such as a garage or basement. 

Product Spotlight: Electronic Caregiver

Marybeth Van Horn, 67, a resident of Denver, Colorado and a nurse of 45 years, has both experienced and heard real-life stories of how health technology can save lives. Five years ago, she slipped on black ice in a parking lot, snapping her femur while mid-air. When she hit the pavement, her wrist broke and her lumbar and cervical vertebra shifted, leaving her on the ground in pain. The incident would leave her hospitalized for a month, and bedridden for three more months. At that time, she did not have Electronic Caregiver’s Premier system or she could have immediately called for emergency help.

5 Easy Memory Reminders

Memory loss is a common side effect of aging, especially for those approaching the early stages of Dementia. This can be scary and stressful for our elders and their families, but it doesn’t have to mean the end of an independent lifestyle. Actually, by changing habits and introducing what our clinicians call “compensatory skills,” we can help elders avoid the common pitfalls of memory loss and continue to lead happy and healthy lives. I wanted to share a few of these skills, so all of you who are supporting your elders at home can help them thrive.

Where Is My Mother?

You might find yourself struggling to answer and understand your loved one with dementia. Dementia can change the way people express themselves, and oftentimes needs and desires are vocalized in coded and confusing ways. Surprisingly, one of the most common questions we get from dementia patients goes something like “have you seen my mother?” or “when can I go home?”

Signs Of Memory Loss

As caregivers and concerned family members, we want to make sure our elder loved ones are healthy both physically and mentally. Memory loss is very common amongst older adults, but not a ‘normal’ part of the aging process. We want to identify memory loss early so it can be treated effectively, and in some cases, reversed.

Role Reversal: When Kids Become Caretakers

If you have an aging parent, It’s likely that you’ve already begun to help your parents in ways you’ve never had to before. Maybe you’ve begun to manage paying the bills, driving mom to doctor’s visits, or helping dad out with yard work that he just can’t do anymore. This process of role reversal is called “parentification,”  and it describes the dynamic wherein children assume more and more responsibility and control over their parent’s lives, eventually acting as parents to their parents. While confusing and possibly overwhelming, this process is a very common part of aging for older adults and their families.

Alzheimer’s Is Life Altering For The Whole Family

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of Dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking, and behavior. Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease that eventually interferes with even the most basic daily living tasks. Changes in behavior and personality may require a person with Alzheimer’s to require round the clock care in a specialized facility.

Stroke

Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States, with approximately 795,000 people suffering a stroke each year.

Processing Grief

In many cases, our mental health is rooted in stability derived from a regular routine. Within this routine are the social interactions we take for granted, the projects we derive fulfillment from, and life’s milestones that we can count on looking forward to. With the world in crisis mode, much of this routine has gone by the wayside.

Dementia Care for Seniors

Elderly parents diagnosed with Alzheimers, with aid and proper planning, can continue to live in their own homes for many years with the help of caregivers, outside care providers, and assistive products and devices.

Parkinson’s Disease Is a Major Adjustment For the family

Parkinson’s disease comes with a host of challenges for both the individual and their caregivers. When your parent is diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, modify their homes and lifestyles to make it easier to age in their own home.

Exercising With Alzheimer’s

In many cases, our mental health is rooted in stability derived from a regular routine. Within this routine are the social interactions we take for granted, the projects we derive fulfillment from, and life’s milestones that we can count on looking forward to. With the world in crisis mode, much of this routine has gone by the wayside.

The Impacts of COVID-19 On Alzheimer’s

As many as one in five older adults experience mental health issues, the most common of which are anxiety or mood disorders (such as depression). In most cases, these mental health issues respond well to treatment.

Identifying Early Changes In Cognition

As many as one in five older adults experience mental health issues, the most common of which are anxiety or mood disorders (such as depression). In most cases, these mental health issues respond well to treatment.

Mental Health Needs For Older Adults

As many as one in five older adults experience mental health issues, the most common of which are anxiety or mood disorders (such as depression). In most cases, these mental health issues respond well to treatment.

COVID-19 Coping Strategies

In many cases, our mental health is rooted in stability derived from a regular routine. Within this routine are the social interactions we take for granted, the projects we derive fulfillment from, and life’s milestones that we can count on looking forward to. With the world in crisis mode, much of this routine has gone by the wayside.

Parkinson’s Kitchen Area Adjustments

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, meaning that the patient’s condition will decline over time. There is currently no known cure to effectively stop or slow down the disease. It is important for the patient and family to understand that the adaptation and changes to the living environment will more than likely change over time with evolving needs linked to the current level of disability.

Parkinson’s Bed & Bath Adjustments

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, meaning that the patient’s condition will decline over time. There is currently no known cure to effectively stop or slow down the disease. It is important for the patient and family to understand that the adaptation and changes to the living environment will more than likely change over time with evolving needs linked to the current level of disability.